Monday, December 05, 2016

UKOUG Tech 2016 - Super Sunday

UKOUG 2016 is underway. This year I'm staying at the Jury's Inn hotel, one of a clutch of hotels within a stone's throw of the ICC and all the action of Brindley Place. Proximity is the greatest luxury. My room is on the thirteenth floor, so I have a great view across Birmingham; a view, which in the words of Telly Savalas "almost takes your breath away".

Although the conference proper - with keynotes, exhibition hall and so on - opens today, Monday, the pre-conference Super Sunday has already delivered some cracking talks. For the second year on the trot we have had a stream devoted to database development, which is great for Old Skool developers like me.

Fighting Bad PL/SQL, Phillip Salvisberg

The first talk in the stream discussed various metrics for assessing the the quality of PL/SQL code: McCabe Cyclic Complexity, Halstead Volume, Maintainability Index. Cyclic Complexity evaluates the number of paths through a piece of code; the more paths the harder it is to understand what the code does under any given circumstance. The volume approach assesses information density (the number of distinct words/total number of words); a higher number means more concepts, and so more to understand. The Maintainability Index takes both measures and throws it some extra calculations based on LoC and comments.

All these measures are interesting, and often insights but none are wholly satisfactory. Phillip showed how easier it is to game the MI by putting all the code of a function on a single line: the idea that such a layout makes our code more maintainable is laughable. More worryingly, none of these measures evaluate what the code actually does. The presented example of better PL/SQL (according to the MI measure) replaced several lines of PL/SQL into a single REGEXP_LIKE call. Regular expressions are notorious for getting complicated and hard to maintain. Also there are performance considerations. Metrics won't replace wise human judgement just yet. In the end I agree with Phillip that the most useful metric remains WTFs per minute.

REST enabling Oracle tables with Oracle REST Data Services, Jeff Smith

It was standing room only for That Jeff Smith, who coped well with jetlag and sleep deprivation. ORDS is the new name for the APEX listener, a misleading name because it is used for more than just APEX calls, and APEX doesn't need it. ORDS is a Java application which brokers JSON calls between a web client and the database: going one way it converts JSON payload into SQL statements, going the other way it converts result sets into JSON messages. Apparently Oracle is going to REST enable the entire database - Jeff showed us the set of REST commands for managing DataGuard. ORDS is the backbone of Oracle Cloud.

Most of the talk centred on Oracle's capabilities for auto-enabling REST access to tables (and PL/SQL with the next release of ORDS). This is quite impressive and certainly I can see the appeal of standing up a REST web service to the database without all the tedious pfaffing in Hibernate or whatever Java framework is in place. However I think auto-enabling is the wrong approach. REST calls are stateless and cannot be assembled to form transactions; basically each one auto-commits. It's Table APIs all over again. TAPI 2.0, if you will. It's a recipe for bad applications.

But I definitely like this vision of the future: an MVC implementation with JavaScript clients (V) passing JSON payloads to ORDS (C) with PL/SQL APIs doing all the business logic (M). The nineties revival starts here.

Meet your match: advanced row pattern matching, Stew Ashton

Stew's talk was one of those ones which are hard to pull off: Oracle 12c's MATCH RECOGNIZE clause is a topic more suited to an article with a database on hand so we can work through the examples. Stew succeeded in making it work as a talk because he's a good speaker with a nice style and a knack for lucid explanation. He made a very good case for the importance of understanding this arcane new syntax.

MATCH RECOGNIZE is lifted from event processing. It allows us to define arbitrary sets of data which we can iterate over in a SELECT statement. This allows us to solve several classes of problems relating to bin filtering, positive and negative sequencing, and hierarchical summaries. The most impressive example showed how to code an inequality (i.e. range) join that performs as well as an equality join. I will certainly be downloading this presentation and learning the syntax when I get back home.

If only Stew had done a talk on the MODEL clause several years ago.

SQL for change history with Temporal Validity and Flash Back Data Archive, Chris Saxon

Chris Saxon tackled the tricky concept of time travel in the database, as a mechanism for handling change. The first type of change is change in transactional data. For instance, when a customer moves house we need to retain a record of their former address as well as their new one. We've all implemented history like this, with START_DATE and END_DATE columns. The snag has always been how to formulate the query to establish which record applies at a given point in time. Oracle 12C solves this with Temporal Validity, a syntax for defining a PERIOD using those start and end dates. Then we can query the history using a simple AS OF PERIOD clause. It doesn't solve all the problems in this area (primary keys remain tricky) but at least the queries are solved.

The other type of change is change in metadata: when was a particular change applied? what are all the states of a record over the last year? etc. These are familiar auditing requirements, which are usually addressed through triggers and journalling tables. That approach carries an ongoing burden of maintenance and is too easy to get wrong. Oracle has had a built-in solution for several years now, Flashback Data Archive. Not enough people use it, probably because in 11g it was called Total Recall and a chargeable extra. In 12C Flashback Data Archive is free; shorn of the data optimization (which requires the Advanced Compression package) it is available in Standard Edition not just Enterprise. And it's been back-ported to 11.2.0.4. The syntax is simple: to get a historical version of the data we simply use AS OF TIMESTAMP. No separate query for a journalling table, no more nasty triggers to maintain... I honestly don't know why everybody isn't using it.

So that was Super Sunday. Roll on Not-So-Mundane Monday.

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